Tag Archives: *

Families of civil administrators in Safavid Iran

Long-term career strategies of the Khwājas of Barnābād (Khorasan, ca. 15th-18th c.)* [DYNTRAN Working Paper, no. 30, November 2017]

by Maria SZUPPE

Under the Safavid dynasty in Iran (1501-1722 or 1736 CE) provincial administration was frequently entrusted into the hands of local, influential families that were firmly and securely established in their regions of origin. Continue reading Families of civil administrators in Safavid Iran

An Ottoman Humanist on the Long Road to Egypt

Salih Celalzade’s Tārīḫ-i Mıṣır Al-Cedid [DYNTRAN Working Paper, no. 29, October 2017]

by Giancarlo CASALE

Mustafa Celalzade (d. 1567) was a towering figure of Ottoman history, a larger-than-life scholar-statesman who served more than two decades as the empire’s grand chancellor. But his younger brother, Salih Celalzade (d. 1565), was cut from a different cloth, Continue reading An Ottoman Humanist on the Long Road to Egypt

Mausoleums in Safavid Family History

An Unpublished Royal Edict from the Ardabil Shrine (912/1507) [DYNTRAN WORKING PAPER 28, September 2017]

by Naofumi ABE

The presence of family mausoleums is a common phenomenon in Muslim-majority regions of Western and Central Asia, Northern Africa, and the Indian Subcontinent. Modern research on Muslim mausoleums has been mainly linked to scholarly interest Continue reading Mausoleums in Safavid Family History

Binge Reading in Fifteenth-Century Damascus

Binge Reading in Fifteenth-Century Damascus [DYNTRAN Working Paper, no. 27, August 2017]

by Konrad HIRSCHLER

At the end of the ninth/fifteenth century, in the year 897/1492, a Damascene scholar sat down in his garden to read through his considerable library. He neither did so silently nor alone, rather he read the books aloud with members of his family. Over the course of Continue reading Binge Reading in Fifteenth-Century Damascus